PADI Open Water Diver Touch

padi elearning courses cyprus


Watch, listen, read, scroll, tap and interact while you learn to scuba dive with PADI Open Water Diver Touch. It’s fun, it’s easy, it’s portable and it’s your entry to the underwater world as a scuba diver.

For kids, we will strongly recommend for you to purchase the PADI Open Water Diver Touch program, which runs on either a iPad or Android tablet. The interactive program allows your kid to watch videos and answer questions, which means learning more interactive and fun for them.

Once the theory portion is independently completed by your child, we will require him to make an arrangement to come in for a short theory class for us to evaluate his readiness for confined water training.

There will be an extra charge for PADI Open water Diver Touch program payable directly to PADI. 

PADI Open Water Diver Touch – Whether you’ve always wanted to scuba dive, discover new adventures or simply see the wondrous world beneath the waves, you can start today with the PADI Open Water Diver Touch on your tablet.

The iOS version is now and an Android version.

PADI Open Water Diver Touch

Watch, listen, read, scroll, tap and interact while you learn to scuba dive with PADI Open Water Diver TouchTM. It’s fun, it’s easy, it’s portable and it’s your entry to the underwater world as a scuba diver.

The Touch integrates the PADI Open Water Diver Manual with the PADI Open Water Diver Video into a powerful, tablet-based learning experience. When you dive in with the Touch, you’ll:

  • Learn diving facts, principles and safety concepts in preparation for your confined and open water dives.
  • Watch video clips that show you the world of scuba diving.
  • Take simple quizzes to make sure you understand the material as you progress.

After you download the Touch, you don’t need to be online to use it so you can truly learn anytime, anywhere.

Want to try it? Download the free PADI Library app for Apple or Android and experience the Touch introduction. Trying to decide which method of learning is best for your PADI Open Water Diver course?

Learn more about the Touch or contact our PADI Dive Center to help you decide.

PADI Open Water Diver Touch - padi elearning

Commercial Diving

KM Helmet Technician

Commercial Diving

Commercial divers solve complex tasks, often in deep waters. But what exactly do they do?

Divers come in many shapes and sizes. Strictly speaking, we can divide them into four types: recreational, technical, professional and commercial divers. Recreational divers make up the majority of the group, and are typically trained to dive up to 130 feet with scuba gear. Technical divers can go beyond 130 feet, and will utilize other types of gear than scuba, such as rebreathers. Professional divers are divemasters, dive guides, dive instructors and course directors. These people guide or train the other two groups, and all three belong to an organization such as PADI, SSI or NAUI.

Commercial divers, however, are in a completely different category. They dive not to train recreational divers, but to complete job-related tasks, and require specific job training in addition to dive training. This training typically takes place at schools that are dedicated to commercial diving, and which are organized under national boards for commercial diving. But what kind of work does can a commercial diver do? Four of the most typical careers for commercial divers follow.

Construction Divers

Construction divers work in harbors, on bridges, or in other situations where large-scale construction must be built or maintained in water. They also do underwater surveys, work on coastal protection. Many Commercial divers work on laying, inspecting and maintaining underwater cables and pipelines.
Diving in these conditions requires commercial-dive training using both types of scuba units and surface-supported equipment, as well as training with a range of tools and techniques, such as welding.

Divers can descend up to 200 meters/600 feet, which requires extended decompression times. Saturation diving, wherein divers spend great times at depth, is often used, as once their tissues have become fully saturated with nitrogen, their decompression time does not increase (unless they move to a greater depth).

After their shift is done (and these can last 12 hours or more), divers are brought to the surface and decompressed in a chamber.

Offshore

Offshore divers are usually associated with gas or oil platforms, and may work on the construction and maintenance of rigs, as well as the actual drilling process, where they may inspect the drill and make any repairs needed. They can also perform visual inspections of underwater equipment. These types of dives are usually done with surface-supported equipment, and may also be done as saturation dives for deeper projects. Offshore commercial diving is often cited as one of the most dangerous jobs in the world.

HAZMAT

KM Helmet Technician
HAZMAT is shorthand for HAZardous MATerials, and HAZMAT diving takes place where there is significant risk of exposure to pollutants that are hazardous to human health, which can be anything from raw sewage to radiation-contaminated waters. Tasks can include repairs to filters, valves, or other mechanical equipment, to surveying and sampling contaminated water. This form of diving, in addition to commercial-diving training, requires HAZMAT training and specialized equipment, including a HAZMAT drysuit, as many chemical pollutants can penetrate the material of traditional drysuits.

Salvaging

Commercial divers also find their trade in salvaging. Salvage divers sometimes work independently, searching for wrecks, flotsam or jetsam, which they subsequently claim, salvage, and try to sell for a profit. Other salvage divers work as subcontractors to commercial shipping companies or governments, salvaging goods lost or, as in the case of the Costa Concordia cruise ship which ran aground in Italy, to salvage and remove a wreck that is deemed to pose a threat to the environment or a problem for ship routes.

There are many other jobs that commercial divers might undertake, in particular within rescue services, the police and the armed forces, but the above are the main fields within the private sector.

Mechanical Dive Technician

Ever thought about becoming a commercial diver? Share your story!

Ocean Trash

ocean trash end up on polluted beaches

ocean trash biodegrade

The Best Way to Deal With Ocean Trash

Plastic debris doubles every decade. What ends up in the ocean is nearly impossible to clean up.
Photo of a manta ray and sea turtle swimming amongst trash.
A manta ray and a green sea turtle feed in the midst of plastic bags, milk jugs, and other debris floating off one of Oahu’s highest-rated beaches.

Laura Parker
National Geographic

Tony Haymet, former director of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, has heard hundreds of ocean cleanup plans. Late at night, over many beers, he’s come up with a few dozen of his own. None of them, he says, has seemed likely to work.

That includes this spring’s offerings. A Dutch engineering student, Boyan Slat, envisions a contraption with massive booms that would sweep debris into a huge funnel. Songwriter and music producer Pharrell Williams wants to fund the monumental cost of any cleanup by turning recycled ocean plastic into yarn and then clothes.

The challenge is huge. For one thing, the garbage is spread over millions of square miles. For another, it’s made up mostly of degraded plastic, broken down by sunlight and waves into tiny bits the size of grains of rice.

“That’s what makes it so horrifying,” Haymet says. “The micro-plastic is the same size as the stuff living in the water column. How would we ever go out and collect it? So far no one’s come up with a plan to separate all the micro-plastic from the living life that’s the same size.”

In the face of growing criticism, Slat had to back off his optimistic boast that he could clean up the oceans in five years. He posted a notice on his website asking the media and the critics to wait until he finishes his research.

Meanwhile, the garbage keeps growing.

Consider this alarming statistic from CSIRO, Australia’s national science agency, which is wrapping up a three-year study of marine debris: Every decade global production of plastics doubles. Even if someone came up with a workable collecting mechanism, how much impact could it have?

“If we are doubling what we are putting into the ocean on a ten-year basis, there’s no way to keep up,” says Chris Wilcox, an ecologist at CSIRO. “It would be as if you were vacuuming your living room, and I’m standing at the Plastic-Beach-Waste-Litter-Aruba-Corbis-Paul-Soudersdoorway with a bag of dust and a fan. You can constantly keep vacuuming, but you could never catch up.”

Photo of trash covering a beach in Aruba.
Trash litters a beach in Aruba.

 

 

The Garbage Patches

Most of the garbage accumulates in five little-explored “patches” found in the doldrums of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans.

The largest is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, which starts a few hundred miles off the coast of North America and stretches to a few hundred miles off the coast of Japan; a more concentrated area lies between California and Hawaii.

One commonly accepted estimate is that the high-density area inside the Great Pacific Garbage Patch contains 480,000 pieces of plastic per square kilometer (nearly four-tenths of a square mile). But scientists say that’s only a guess.
Altogether the globe’s garbage patches contain 200 million tons of floating debris and ocean trash which just ends up on polluted beaches.
Charles Moore, who “discovered” the Great Pacific Garbage Patch in the late 1990s and plans a research trip there in July, estimates that altogether the globe’s garbage patches contain 200 million tons of floating debris. He came up with the figure based on calculations that 2.5 percent of the world’s plastic ends up in the sea.

Marcus Eriksen, a marine scientist and co-founder of the California-based 5 Gyres, which studies the five main garbage patches, estimates the total floating debris is just 500,000 tons.

In either case, the harm to fish and other sea creatures is increasing. A 2009 research trip to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch by Scripps found 9 percent of the fish had ingested plastic. Eriksen, with help from seven other scientists, recently analysed material in all of the garbage patches. Of 671 fish collected, 35 percent had ingested plastic particles.

“Either number scares me,” Haymet says. “Those are only the sick fish—not the ones who died because they ate plastic that was too big. And they are the only two studies. There should be hundreds of studies of this stuff. Our life, our economies are totally dependent on the oceans. Fifty percent of the oxygen we breathe is made in the ocean every night.”

underwater scuba toilet ocean trash

Photo of a scuba diver atop a pile of discarded toilets on the sea floor.
A scuba diver investigates a pile of discarded toilets on the seafloor.
PHOTOGRAPH BY FLORIS LEEUWENBERG, THE COVER STORY/CORBIS

 

 

Addressing the Problem

Haymet and like-minded ocean scientists haven’t given up. They favor a low-tech, more practical approach to protecting the oceans from trash: Persuade the world’s people to stop littering.

Only about 20 percent of ocean plastic comes from marine sources, such as discarded fishing equipment or cargo ship mishaps. About 80 percent of it washes out to sea from beach litter or was carried downstream in rivers, according to the CSIRO study, which is considered the most comprehensive.

About half of that litter is plastic bottles. Most of the rest is packaging.

“All of that stuff was in a human’s hand at one point or another,” Wilcox says. “The essence of the solution is to provide incentives for people not to throw this stuff away. It is the cheapest, simplest, and far most efficient solution to the problem.”

Creating incentives to help reduce littering can be a political challenge. Only one of Australia’s eight main states and territories has a beverage-container deposit law, says Britta Denise Hardesty, who conducted the CSIRO study.

In the U.S. only ten states—including California, Maine, Massachusetts, and Connecticut-have enacted container deposit laws. Opinion polls show support for such laws, but beverage manufacturers have opposed legislation. They argue that bottle deposits are more expensive than other forms of recycling and that requiring deposits constitutes a tax, which increases the cost of beverages.

“When you think about climate change, it’s hard to reduce our carbon footprint, because we have to go through a fundamental shift in our economies,” Wilcox says. “With plastic, when you’re throwing a bottle cap on the ground, that should be an easy impact to get rid of.”

ocean trash end up on polluted beaches

Snorkeling

snorkeling

Try Scuba Diving

Padi Discover Scuba Diving

Try Scuba Diving!

Who should Try Scuba Diving Experience?

Thinking about giving Scuba Diving a try? Have you always wondered what it’s like to breathe underwater? If you want to try scuba diving in Cyprus, but aren’t quite ready to take the plunge into a scuba diving certification, Discover Scuba Diving is for you.

Easy Divers offer this program off a beach called Green bay Protaras. While this is not a scuba certification, Discover Scuba Diving is a quick and easy way to introduce you to what it takes to explore the underwater aquatic world of Cyprus .

To sign up for a Scuba Diving experience with a padi instructor, you must be at least 10 years old. No prior experience with scuba diving is necessary, but you need to be in reasonable physical health.

Are you ready to try it out?

Contact Us for Discover Scuba Diving experience on your next holidays in Cyprus.

 What will you learn?

You going to learn the basic safety guidelines, rules and skills needed to dive. Easy Divers will be guided you with one of our Trained Padi Scuba Professionals. That mean under our direct supervision of a PADI Professional. You will be making an open water dive, that means you’ll practice a few more skills in shallow water to prepare for your scuba adventure.

We will cover all you need to know about:

  • scuba equipment you use to dive and how easy it is to move around underwater with your gear.
  • Learn about different fishes and turtles you will during your dive.
  • Find out what it’s like to breathe underwater.
  • Learn important skills that you’ll use during your Try Scuba Diving experience.
  • Have fun swimming around and exploring while Scuba Diving.
  • Once you have completed the Scuba Diving, you may wand to dive again or become a certified diver through the PADI Open Water Diver course.

How can you start learning now?

Contact Easy Divers in Cyprus, we are  PADI Dive Center. Begin your scuba experience by signing up for a Try  Scuba Diving program and get a Padi Discover Scuba Diving Participant Guide when you arrive for your scuba lesson at Easy Divers CyprusYour Participant Guide explains the experience and lets you pre-study the safety rules and skill techniques your dive professional will review with you.

What scuba gear will you use?

Our PADI Pro will provide all the basic scuba gear you’ll use including a mask, snorkel, fins, regulator, buoyancy control device, dive gauges and a scuba tank.

When you arrive at our diving centre we will go over a Scuba Diving Flip Chart where you’ll  learn more skills and the gear you will need to start your adventures in  Scuba Diving.

Next Step

Breathing underwater for the first time is great experience and fun for all the family, so don’t wait get your scuba lesson booked!!!

We have limited spaces on each day of Try Scuba Diving!