padi diver specialty courses

padi speciality courses cyprus

 

If you plan to come to Protaras, Cyprus to finish your open water dives or you just plan on making some dives, there is always a reason to get involved in padi diver specialty courses.
These specialty courses can allow you to focus on one portion of diving in more detail and the ones that is more fun and interesting to you.
From dry suit diving courses to underwater naturalist and wreck diving there are courses for every person’s interests. Often these Padi Speciality Courses are available in only certain areas. These specialty courses can help you meet more divers with common interests and allow you to do certain dives that others may not be able to dive. As your skills increase throughout these padi training courses you may find that two specialties would work great together, such as peak performance buoyancy and underwater photography diver. This would allow you to see more of the wreck, even if you’ve seen it many times before!
A few courses that are offered include Emergency Oxygen Provider, Night Diver, Sidemount Diver, Digital Underwater Photographer and Deep Diver, Equipment speciality, even Technical Diving. This is only a couple out of the 24 specialties you can choose from when you dive at Easy Divers Cyprus. Many people will choose to have their Oxygen Provider course done to help out during emergencies that could occur while diving. Others will want to dive longer and take the rebreather or technical course so that they can see more.
No matter what your interests are be sure to contact your Easy Divers in Cyprus. Our Padi Recreational and Technical dive shop to get more information on what padi diver specialty courses

Best Beaches Award Cyprus

Best Beaches Award Cyprus – Breaking News Cyprus

Ayia Napa Beaches ranked 1st and 3rd  for Top Beach Destinations for Europe. Best Beaches Award Cyprus awarded by Trip Advisor.

Best Beaches Award Cyprus

Ayia Napa Cyprus beaches are ranked No1 and No3 in the Top 10 Best Beaches Award Cyprus in Europe!

Cyprus beaches are ranked No1 and No3 in the Top 10 Best Beaches in Europe! Ayia Napa Cyprus Ayia Napa Cyprus Interestingly enough, Ayia Napa beaches came 1st on the list, with Protaras beaches is ranked 3rd!

Interestingly enough, Ayia Napa beaches came 1st on the list, with Protaras beaches is ranked 3rd

Best Beaches Award Cyprus

Fig Tree Bay, Protaras

This family favourite, Fig Tree Bay, on the east coast of the island, is one of the most scenic of Cyprus beaches. Best Beaches Award Cyprus, Shallow, turquoise waters and soft golden sands make it perfect for young children. A great place to chill out for the day – there’s even Wi-Fi (if you must).

Swimmers can swim out to the tiny uninhabited island that is in easy reach through shallow waters. History buffs may be intrigued to know that in 2010 an ancient Greek tomb – containing four coffins – was found on the road leading to the beach, thought to have been untouched for thousands of years.

Konnos Bay, Cape Greco
Konnos Bay, Cape Greco

Another one of Cyprus’s Blue Flag beaches (the island actually has an impressive 57 in total), found a mile east of Ayia Napa, Konnos Bay is a pretty, sheltered beach with wonderfully clear waters. Best Beaches Award Cyprus, Close to the national forest and rugged coastline that is Cape Greco, this is a great choice for families with older children – if you get the chance, take a boat tour out to the many sea caves that are found around this stretch of coast.

REACTIVATE

scuba review - tune up

PADI REACTIVATE – SCUBA REFRESHER

Scuba Tune-up Your Skills

Has it been a while since you’ve been scuba diving? Do you feel like your scuba skills and knowledge are a bit rusty?

Then Scuba Review Tune-up is just the refresher you need. It reacquaints you with diving so that you’re back to feeling comfortable in the underwater world in less than a day.

Get Back into The water with Confidence!

Haven’t been diving lately and want a quick scuba refresher? The ReActivate™ program is the perfect way to update your dive skills and knowledge from the PADI Open Water Diver Course before jumping back into the water. Whether you want a few reminders or need to go over the basics, ReActivate is personalized for you: You conveniently review scuba concepts on your tablet, mobile device or computer, then go diving with a PADI Professional.

It’s quick and easy, and a good way to prepare for your next PADI course or get ready for a diving vacation. The best part is, divers who complete both the knowledge and in-water skill refresher receive a replacement certification card with a ReActivated date on it.

Any PADI certified diver who wants a refresher or pre-travel update should ReActivate. Dive shops appreciate seeing a recent ReActivate date on your certification card because it means you’re ready to dive in.

The Fun Part

Brush up on your scuba knowledge and skills. Improve your diving ability, and get your scuba gear ready for your next scuba vacation or diving holiday.

What You Learn

PADI Scuba Review – ReActivate. Has it been a while since you’ve been scuba diving? You go over scuba knowledge you learned during your initial training. Then, practice fundamental skills in a pool or a confined water area.

scuba tune up - refresh your skillsYou review:

  • Safe diving practices

  • Dive planning fundamentals

  • Problem management

  • Breathing air at depth

  • Recreational diving and dive tables: basic knowledge

  • Recreational diving and dive tables: dive planning

  • After you complete the knowledge assessment, you go through the Confined Water Skills Preview. You review information about each skill, why its important, points to remember when performing the skill and possibly a short video clip. Completing this section just before practising is a great way to refresh your knowledge of how each skill is performed.

ReActivate Scuba Review course is particularly beneficial if you:

  • Just haven’t scuba dived for a while and want to get acclimated again

  • Are a PADI Open Water Diver course referral student who wants a refresher prior to making your open water training dives

  • Are a PADI Scuba Diver who wants to upgrade to Open Water Diver

What does it cover?

PADI ReActivate Scuba Tune-up Online content is broken down into 8 easy-to-learn sections after an introduction, covering Safe Diving Practices, Dive Planning Fundamentals, Problem Management, Breathing Air at Depth, Dive Computers and Dive Tables, Planning Dives with the RDP, eRDP, Diving with Enriched Air Nitrox and Diving Skills Review.

Who can benefit from completing the course?

The course is designed for anyone who wants to refresh their dive knowledge. The program is primarily designed for certified divers who wish to return to scuba diving after a period of inactivity, however, it is also a great resource for those who are returning to a course after a shorter break in the training.

How does it work?

After enrolling, PADI’s eLearning® system presents you with interactive presentations that include videos, audio, graphics and reading. Short quizzes let you check understanding of the presented information before moving on. This lets you go through the program efficiently and at your own pace. End-of-section exams verify your mastery of the entire topic and are automatically scored.

What else is required to complete the course?

While PADI ReActivate Scuba Tune-up Online does not necessarily require that any training dives in confined or open water take place, it is certainly recommended so that your skills can be refreshed as well as your knowledge. Be sure and discuss the options you have for completing any practical elements with Padi Instructors at Easy Divers to maximize the benefit of completing the PADI Scuba Tune-up Online.

What does it cost?

The course fee for PADI ReActivate Scuba Tune-up Online is € 50.00 EUR, non-refundable or you can request a PADI Access Pass from Easy Divers Cyprus. Contact Us

What else is required to complete the course?
While PADI ReActivate Scuba Tune-up Online does not necessarily require that any training dives in confined or open water take place, it makes sense to refresh both your knowledge and skills. Be sure and discuss the options you have for completing the practical elements with one of our Padi Instructors at Easy Divers to maximize the benefit of completing the PADI Scuba Tune-up Online.

How long do you have to complete the eLearning course?

The eLearning course will be available for one year from the time of course registration.

What is the minimum amount of time it will take to complete this eLearning program?
If all information is reviewed, the PADI ReActivate Scuba Tune-Up online will take approximately 5 hours to complete.

How do you document that you’ve completed the eLearning segment?

Once you finish the ReActivate eLearning portion of the course, your dive centre is notified that you have completed it and that you are ready for the practical phase of the program, if there is going to be one. If you are going to participate in a practical phase at the end of the eLearning program, you can print out your eRecord and bring a copy of it with you to our PADI Dive Centre and Padi Instructors at Easy Divers will check its complete.

Sidemount Diving

sidemount diving cyprus

Sidemount Diving Courses

Who should take the padi sidemount course?

Having scuba tanks on your back isn’t a requirement for exploring the underwater world. Many scuba divers have discovered the joy of mounting cylinders on their sides too. Sidemount diving gives you more flexibility and streamlining for underwater diving. You don’t have to walk with heavy cylinders on your back – just enter the water, clip them on and go. Interested? Contact Us for the PADI Sidemount Diver Specialty course with Easy Divers in Cyprus.

If you’re a PADI Open Water Diver who is at least 15 years old, you can enrol in a PADI Sidemount Diver course.

What will you learn?

Along with learning about the many benefits of diving for Sidemount configuration.

You will make at least one confined water and three open water scuba dives. Each dive you will build your confidence in your new scuba equipment configuration.

During the Padi Sidemount course you’ll learn how to:

  • Properly assemble and configure Sidemount scuba diving equipment.
  • Trim your weight system and Sidemount gear so you’re perfectly balanced and streamlined in the water.
  • Manage gas/air by switching second stage regulators as planned, if wearing two cylinders.
  • Respond correctly to potential problems when Sidemount diving.

If your considered technical diving, you may realise that technical divers always wear more than one tank. Taking the Sidemount diving course your will make you more comfortable in wearing extra tanks and you may consider the technical diving courses?

Sidemount is an increasingly popular way to configure multiple cylinders for recreational dives and technical diving. When you take this course you can enter the world of tec diving with the Tec or Rec Sidemount Diver course.

Apply what you learn on this course to other courses like the TecRec Courses. Your instructor may offer to integrate this course with the Tec 40 Tec 45 or Tec 50 technical diving courses at Easy Divers Cyprus.

If you’re a Padi Open Water Diver you may take the Recreational Padi Sidemount Course. PADI Advanced Open Water Diver, at least 18 years old and have a minimum of 30 logged dives, you may qualify for a Tec Sidemount Diver course.

It’s recommended that you also have a PADI Enriched Air Diver certification.

Note: that qualifying certifications from other diver training organizations may apply – ask our Tec Deep Instructor.

Scuba Gear: Special Sidemount Equipment, Extra regulators and dive cylinders.

Cost: €350

Duration: 2 – 3 days

PADI Open Water Diver Touch


Watch, listen, read, scroll, tap and interact while you learn to scuba dive with PADI Open Water Diver Touch. It’s fun, it’s easy, it’s portable and it’s your entry to the underwater world as a scuba diver.

For kids, we will strongly recommend for you to purchase the PADI Open Water Diver Touch program, which runs on either a iPad or Android tablet. The interactive program allows your kid to watch videos and answer questions, which means learning more interactive and fun for them.

Once the theory portion is independently completed by your child, we will require him to make an arrangement to come in for a short theory class for us to evaluate his readiness for confined water training.

There will be an extra charge for PADI Open water Diver Touch program payable directly to PADI. 

PADI Open Water Diver Touch – Whether you’ve always wanted to scuba dive, discover new adventures or simply see the wondrous world beneath the waves, you can start today with the PADI Open Water Diver Touch on your tablet.

The iOS version is now and an Android version.

PADI Open Water Diver Touch

Watch, listen, read, scroll, tap and interact while you learn to scuba dive with PADI Open Water Diver TouchTM. It’s fun, it’s easy, it’s portable and it’s your entry to the underwater world as a scuba diver.

The Touch integrates the PADI Open Water Diver Manual with the PADI Open Water Diver Video into a powerful, tablet-based learning experience. When you dive in with the Touch, you’ll:

  • Learn diving facts, principles and safety concepts in preparation for your confined and open water dives.
  • Watch video clips that show you the world of scuba diving.
  • Take simple quizzes to make sure you understand the material as you progress.

After you download the Touch, you don’t need to be online to use it so you can truly learn anytime, anywhere.

Want to try it? Download the free PADI Library app for Apple or Android and experience the Touch introduction. Trying to decide which method of learning is best for your PADI Open Water Diver course?

Learn more about the Touch or contact our PADI Dive Center to help you decide.

PADI Open Water Diver Touch - padi elearning

Padi IDC

padi idc

Instructor and students during scuba diving lessons

Padi IDC – Padi Instructor Development Centre in Cyprus. Easy Divers

Start making the right choices and become PADI scuba diving instructor, it starts you on the most rewarding and super exciting careers of your life. Get your chance to meet new people every day, travel the world and begin to share your passion for the underwater world.

We know that with all the diving enthusiasm you have for teaching scuba should be passed on to your students. Just a smile on their faces after their Padi Discover Scuba Diving or their Padi Openwater Course, they will not stop talking about the adventure.

Training to be a Padi Instructor starts with first completing the Padi Divemaster Course and the making the choice to take your PADI IDC.

The Full Padi IDC will take around 9 days to complete with a Padi Course Director like Joey A. Ridge at Easy Divers in Protaras Cyprus.

The PADI Instructor Development Course (Padi IDC) is an 9-day course, depending some choices like eLearning or a more traditional method conducted by the Padi Course Director and help prepare IDC candidates to become ready as PADI Open Water Scuba Instructors.

Easy Divers Padi IDC is divided into two distinct segments.

The first section is the 3-day (Padi eLearning) or 5-day(traditional) PADI Assistant Instructor (Padi AI) course.

The second portion is the 5-day PADI Open Water Scuba Instructor (Padi OWSI) course. Together these two courses combine to make the complete and entire Padi IDC. Both courses must be completed before attending any PADI Instructor Examination (IE).

Each section can be scheduled as a stand-alone course or completed all together at once.
The Padi IDC Curriculum emphasis is focused on instructor development approach and is not to tests or stress you out! This makes learning easier, fun and more relaxing when learning to be a Padi Instructor.

Padi IDC Training components in the PADI Instructor Development Course Curriculum:

Course Orientation
Developing Knowledge Development Presentations
Prescriptive Teaching Presentations
Teaching in Confined Water
Confined Water Teaching Presentations
Conducting Open Water Dives
Open Water Teaching Presentations
General Standards and Procedures
Open Water Diver Course
Adventures in Diving Program and Workshop
Discover Scuba Diving Workshop
Rescue Diver Course and Workshop
Divemaster Course
Risk Management

Sections Available through Padi Padi eLearning or for Presentation in Class:

Learning, Instruction and the PADI System
General Standards and Procedures
Risk Management
Marketing Diving
Start Diving
Teaching PADI Specialty Diver Courses
Business of Diving
Keep Diving
How to Teach the RDP

 

Dive Equipment Requirements:

  • Full set of scuba gear including compass, knife, pocket mask, dive computer.

 Padi IDC Entry Requirements:

  • Proof of PADI Open Water, Advanced, Rescue and Divemaster certifications (or qualifying certification from another training organization).
  • Certified Open Water Diver for at least 6 months
  • First Aid and CPR training for Adult, Infant and Child within the last 24 months (PADI Emergency First Response certification recommended)
  • PADI Diving Medical Statement signed by a physician and dated within the last 12 months
  • Proof of at least 60 logged open water scuba dives
  • Logged proof of deep, night & navigation diving

Contact Easy Divers For Further Information

 Padi IDC in Cyprus

Commercial Diving

Commercial Diving

Commercial divers solve complex tasks, often in deep waters. But what exactly do they do?

Divers come in many shapes and sizes. Strictly speaking, we can divide them into four types: recreational, technical, professional and commercial divers. Recreational divers make up the majority of the group, and are typically trained to dive up to 130 feet with scuba gear. Technical divers can go beyond 130 feet, and will utilize other types of gear than scuba, such as rebreathers. Professional divers are divemasters, dive guides, dive instructors and course directors. These people guide or train the other two groups, and all three belong to an organization such as PADI, SSI or NAUI.

Commercial divers, however, are in a completely different category. They dive not to train recreational divers, but to complete job-related tasks, and require specific job training in addition to dive training. This training typically takes place at schools that are dedicated to commercial diving, and which are organized under national boards for commercial diving. But what kind of work does can a commercial diver do? Four of the most typical careers for commercial divers follow.

Construction Divers

Construction divers work in harbors, on bridges, or in other situations where large-scale construction must be built or maintained in water. They also do underwater surveys, work on coastal protection. Many Commercial divers work on laying, inspecting and maintaining underwater cables and pipelines.
Diving in these conditions requires commercial-dive training using both types of scuba units and surface-supported equipment, as well as training with a range of tools and techniques, such as welding.

Divers can descend up to 200 meters/600 feet, which requires extended decompression times. Saturation diving, wherein divers spend great times at depth, is often used, as once their tissues have become fully saturated with nitrogen, their decompression time does not increase (unless they move to a greater depth).

After their shift is done (and these can last 12 hours or more), divers are brought to the surface and decompressed in a chamber.

Offshore

Offshore divers are usually associated with gas or oil platforms, and may work on the construction and maintenance of rigs, as well as the actual drilling process, where they may inspect the drill and make any repairs needed. They can also perform visual inspections of underwater equipment. These types of dives are usually done with surface-supported equipment, and may also be done as saturation dives for deeper projects. Offshore commercial diving is often cited as one of the most dangerous jobs in the world.

HAZMAT

KM Helmet Technician
HAZMAT is shorthand for HAZardous MATerials, and HAZMAT diving takes place where there is significant risk of exposure to pollutants that are hazardous to human health, which can be anything from raw sewage to radiation-contaminated waters. Tasks can include repairs to filters, valves, or other mechanical equipment, to surveying and sampling contaminated water. This form of diving, in addition to commercial-diving training, requires HAZMAT training and specialized equipment, including a HAZMAT drysuit, as many chemical pollutants can penetrate the material of traditional drysuits.

Salvaging

Commercial divers also find their trade in salvaging. Salvage divers sometimes work independently, searching for wrecks, flotsam or jetsam, which they subsequently claim, salvage, and try to sell for a profit. Other salvage divers work as subcontractors to commercial shipping companies or governments, salvaging goods lost or, as in the case of the Costa Concordia cruise ship which ran aground in Italy, to salvage and remove a wreck that is deemed to pose a threat to the environment or a problem for ship routes.

There are many other jobs that commercial divers might undertake, in particular within rescue services, the police and the armed forces, but the above are the main fields within the private sector.

Mechanical Dive Technician

Ever thought about becoming a commercial diver? Share your story!

Clear Your Scuba Mask

clear your scuba mask

Tips on How To Clear Water From Your Scuba Mask While Scuba Diving

How To Clear Water From You Scuba Mask While Scuba Diving

Scuba Diving Mask Clearing TechniquesClear Your Scuba Mask like many scuba newbies find mask clearing very tricky at first. Often they rush through this skill during their entry-level training, hoping to get it over with as soon as possible so that they won’t have to do it again. In reality, though this is the skill that you’ll probably use most often while diving. Here are a few easy ways to make this essential skill a snap.

Blow out of your nose and look up and Clear Your Scuba Mask

When clearing your mask, you want to create a pressure change by blowing air into it; the air you push in will push the water out of the mask. Create a tight seal between the mask and your face at the top by placing the index and middle fingers of both hands on the top part of your mask’s frame, exerting a slight pressure. Doing so ensures that the air you blow out of your nose will not simply bubble out at the top of your mask, but rather it come out at the bottom, pushing out any water that might be in your mask along with it.

To help this process even more, tilt your head up as you blow out through your nose. The water will collect at the bottom of your mask for easy clearing.

Remember that it may take a few tries to remove the water completely, so keep going, breathing in through your mouth and out through your nose, until you have cleared all the water.

Don’t break the seal at the bottom

If water gets in your mask while snorkeling, your natural reaction may be to lift your face out of the water and move the bottom of the mask away from your face to allow the water to run out. This makes perfect sense…above the surface. This will have the opposite effect underwater. If you break the lower seal between your mask and your face, all you’re doing is blowing bubbles out your nose into the ocean and your mask will probably just fill up with water again. This could be a very uncomfortable experience (as you might get water up your nose) and could also result in a feeling that you cannot clear your mask, which could in turn lead to a stressful and panicked situation.

Sometimes the mask’s seal against your cheeks makes it almost impossible to clear it without lifting the mask away from your face at the bottom. In this case use your thumbs to lift the bottom of your mask slightly; I usually aim for about a millimeter or hair’s breadth.

Shave your moustache

The first thing the dive center staff will explain when you’re purchasing or trying on a mask is that you must check how well it seals against your face. Masks are designed to fit differently shaped faces. The size of the skirt and the location of the seal will make a mask fit better on certain sized and shaped faces.

Some customers might find that they have water in their mask most of the time, no matter how many masks they try out — one of the main culprits for this is facial hair. Whether you have a full moustache, or just a few days’ worth of holiday stubble, hair on your upper lip is more than likely to break the seal of your mask and thus let in water. If you are happy to dive with some water in your nose pocket, this is perfectly fine. If, however, the thought of clearing your mask every few minutes doesn’t sound like fun, there are a few options.

Smearing a fair-sized glob of Vaseline onto your stubbly upper lip should help create a better seal. Or you can shave…I know this is the worst chore while you’re on vacation, but take some inspiration from one of my Open Water students who shaved his moustache for the first time in 40 years to avoid a leaky mask during his course. Now THAT is dedication!

Just remember that when diving, some water may come up your nose. This is okay. Use these techniques to become more comfortable when clearing your mask, and you’ll become a much more comfortable diver. Clear Your Scuba Mask maybe that little water will disappear from the mask.

Ocean Trash

ocean trash biodegrade

The Best Way to Deal With Ocean Trash

Plastic debris doubles every decade. What ends up in the ocean is nearly impossible to clean up.
Photo of a manta ray and sea turtle swimming amongst trash.
A manta ray and a green sea turtle feed in the midst of plastic bags, milk jugs, and other debris floating off one of Oahu’s highest-rated beaches.

Laura Parker
National Geographic

Tony Haymet, former director of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, has heard hundreds of ocean cleanup plans. Late at night, over many beers, he’s come up with a few dozen of his own. None of them, he says, has seemed likely to work.

That includes this spring’s offerings. A Dutch engineering student, Boyan Slat, envisions a contraption with massive booms that would sweep debris into a huge funnel. Songwriter and music producer Pharrell Williams wants to fund the monumental cost of any cleanup by turning recycled ocean plastic into yarn and then clothes.

The challenge is huge. For one thing, the garbage is spread over millions of square miles. For another, it’s made up mostly of degraded plastic, broken down by sunlight and waves into tiny bits the size of grains of rice.

“That’s what makes it so horrifying,” Haymet says. “The micro-plastic is the same size as the stuff living in the water column. How would we ever go out and collect it? So far no one’s come up with a plan to separate all the micro-plastic from the living life that’s the same size.”

In the face of growing criticism, Slat had to back off his optimistic boast that he could clean up the oceans in five years. He posted a notice on his website asking the media and the critics to wait until he finishes his research.

Meanwhile, the garbage keeps growing.

Consider this alarming statistic from CSIRO, Australia’s national science agency, which is wrapping up a three-year study of marine debris: Every decade global production of plastics doubles. Even if someone came up with a workable collecting mechanism, how much impact could it have?

“If we are doubling what we are putting into the ocean on a ten-year basis, there’s no way to keep up,” says Chris Wilcox, an ecologist at CSIRO. “It would be as if you were vacuuming your living room, and I’m standing at the Plastic-Beach-Waste-Litter-Aruba-Corbis-Paul-Soudersdoorway with a bag of dust and a fan. You can constantly keep vacuuming, but you could never catch up.”

Photo of trash covering a beach in Aruba.
Trash litters a beach in Aruba.

 

 

The Garbage Patches

Most of the garbage accumulates in five little-explored “patches” found in the doldrums of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans.

The largest is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, which starts a few hundred miles off the coast of North America and stretches to a few hundred miles off the coast of Japan; a more concentrated area lies between California and Hawaii.

One commonly accepted estimate is that the high-density area inside the Great Pacific Garbage Patch contains 480,000 pieces of plastic per square kilometer (nearly four-tenths of a square mile). But scientists say that’s only a guess.
Altogether the globe’s garbage patches contain 200 million tons of floating debris and ocean trash which just ends up on polluted beaches.
Charles Moore, who “discovered” the Great Pacific Garbage Patch in the late 1990s and plans a research trip there in July, estimates that altogether the globe’s garbage patches contain 200 million tons of floating debris. He came up with the figure based on calculations that 2.5 percent of the world’s plastic ends up in the sea.

Marcus Eriksen, a marine scientist and co-founder of the California-based 5 Gyres, which studies the five main garbage patches, estimates the total floating debris is just 500,000 tons.

In either case, the harm to fish and other sea creatures is increasing. A 2009 research trip to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch by Scripps found 9 percent of the fish had ingested plastic. Eriksen, with help from seven other scientists, recently analysed material in all of the garbage patches. Of 671 fish collected, 35 percent had ingested plastic particles.

“Either number scares me,” Haymet says. “Those are only the sick fish—not the ones who died because they ate plastic that was too big. And they are the only two studies. There should be hundreds of studies of this stuff. Our life, our economies are totally dependent on the oceans. Fifty percent of the oxygen we breathe is made in the ocean every night.”

underwater scuba toilet ocean trash

Photo of a scuba diver atop a pile of discarded toilets on the sea floor.
A scuba diver investigates a pile of discarded toilets on the seafloor.
PHOTOGRAPH BY FLORIS LEEUWENBERG, THE COVER STORY/CORBIS

 

 

Addressing the Problem

Haymet and like-minded ocean scientists haven’t given up. They favor a low-tech, more practical approach to protecting the oceans from trash: Persuade the world’s people to stop littering.

Only about 20 percent of ocean plastic comes from marine sources, such as discarded fishing equipment or cargo ship mishaps. About 80 percent of it washes out to sea from beach litter or was carried downstream in rivers, according to the CSIRO study, which is considered the most comprehensive.

About half of that litter is plastic bottles. Most of the rest is packaging.

“All of that stuff was in a human’s hand at one point or another,” Wilcox says. “The essence of the solution is to provide incentives for people not to throw this stuff away. It is the cheapest, simplest, and far most efficient solution to the problem.”

Creating incentives to help reduce littering can be a political challenge. Only one of Australia’s eight main states and territories has a beverage-container deposit law, says Britta Denise Hardesty, who conducted the CSIRO study.

In the U.S. only ten states—including California, Maine, Massachusetts, and Connecticut-have enacted container deposit laws. Opinion polls show support for such laws, but beverage manufacturers have opposed legislation. They argue that bottle deposits are more expensive than other forms of recycling and that requiring deposits constitutes a tax, which increases the cost of beverages.

“When you think about climate change, it’s hard to reduce our carbon footprint, because we have to go through a fundamental shift in our economies,” Wilcox says. “With plastic, when you’re throwing a bottle cap on the ground, that should be an easy impact to get rid of.”

ocean trash end up on polluted beaches

How To Make Your Air Last Longer

How To Make Your Air Last Longer When Scuba Diving

By Thomas Gronfeldt

Thomas started diving during college and has since been diving over most of the world: Australia, Indonesia, Iceland, France, and many other places. He is a NAUI instructor and a commercial diver, and participates in environmental and archaeological diving projects around the world.
For many divers, available air dictates the length of the dive more than any other factor. Now is the time to learn how make your air last longer for longer dives.

Your dive ends when your bottom time runs out — at least theoretically. For many divers, though, the dive ends when one or more divers run low on air. The easiest way for many of us to extend our dives is to focus on air consumption. These tips will help you get the most out of your tank.

1. Streamline
It’s simple physics: the larger your profile in the water, the more energy, and thus air, you’ll consume. Consider the difference between a bulky semi-truck and a streamlined sports car. In the water, you’ll want to be a sports car. Go over your gear setup and make sure everything is tucked away neatly, creating the smallest possible in-water profile.

2. Leave things behind
A number of divers seem to dive with the saying “it’s better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it” in mind. They bring so much stuff on each dive that it seems like they’re carrying their entire gear bag. Often, they think it’s easier to just clip everything to their BCD than to assess their gear before each dive to determine what they’ll need. There’s some merit to this, but bringing too much gear weighs you down and increases your profile in the water. So bring the things you need and leave behind the things you don’t. And don’t forget to square it all away neatly.

3. Slow down
Diving is the lazy man’s sport, someone once told me, and there’s much truth to that. Diving is not swimming, and you’re not really supposed to get your heart rate up. So slow down — and not just underwater. Get into a relaxed mindset even before you get to the dive site; when you start gearing up, don’t rush. Don’t linger on the dive deck unnecessarily, of course, but go about things in a deliberate, calm manner.  Swim calmly and slowly underwater. The more you rush and fidget, the more air you’ll consume.

4. Breathe deeply
Note the difference between deep breaths and big breaths. When you tell people to breathe deeply, many people will forcefully inhale, filling their lungs to the brink. A deep breath should be just that, but it doesn’t have to be a big breath. To learn to breathe deeply, lie down on a firm surface, like a yoga mat or a firm mattress. Put one hand on your chest and one on your stomach. Now breathe, but try to breathe in such a way that only the hand on your stomach moves. This way, you’re filling up the bottom of your lungs, rather than the top, which is what happens when only your chest moves. A deep-belly breath replenishes the air in your entire respiratory system, rather than just part of it, as when you breathe from the top of your lungs.

5. Swim shallow
An easy way to extend How To Make Your Air Last Longer and dive time is to take full advantage of the traditional multi-level dive profile by starting your dive deep and moving to increasingly shallow water. Here, we consume less air, so simply moving shallower reduces your air consumption drastically, and with that, extends your dive time. If you’re the air hog of a group, you can, to some extent, offset this by placing yourself slightly shallower in the water column than the other divers. And just by making a habit of ending your dive in the shallows, you’ll ensure that any dive you do can be extended quite a bit.

6. Dive more
One easy way to improve your air consumption is quite simply to dive more. Most of the above pieces of advice require some practice, so diving a lot will definitely help you master them. Diving more also helps you become more comfortable in the water, which, in turn, helps a lot when it comes to conserving air.